EliteHR Logistics

Elite HR Logistics IIPP Manual


 

ELITE HR LOGISTICS

 

INJURY & ILLNESS

 

PREVENTION PLAN MANUAL

 

Updated March 28, 2016

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

SAFETY PROGRAM MANUAL

 

  1. POLICY STATEMENT
  2. GOALS
  3. MANAGEMENT COMMITMENT
  4. ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITY
    1. SAFETY COORDINATOR
    2. MANAGER
    3. EMPLOYEES
  5. DISCIPLINE/ENFORCEMENT
  6. CONTROL OF HAZARDS
  7. FIRE PREVENTION
  8. TRAINING AND EDUCATION
  9. SAFETY MEETINGS
  10. RECORDKEEPING AND CAL-OSHA LOG REVIEW
  11. ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION
  12. CODE OF SAFE PRACTICES
  13. WAREHOUSE CODE OF SAFE PRACTICES
  14. HEARING PROTECTION POLICY
  15. RESPIRATORY PROTECTION POLIC
  16. FORKLIFT SAFETY PROCEDURES
  17. FALL PROTECTION POLICY
  18. SCAFFOLDING SAFETY POLICY
  19. CONFINED SPACE/PERMIT CONFINED SPACE POLICY
  20. POWER TOOL SAFETY
  21. EMPLOYEE EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN
  22. HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM
  23. FLEET SAFETY PLAN
  24. FLEET DRIVERS HANDBOOK

 

FORMS APPENDIX

 

  1. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM
  2. SAFETY MEETING MINUTES FORM
  3. SAFETY INSPECTION FORM
  4. ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION FORM
  5. SAFETY COUNSELING STATEMENT FORM
  6. RECEIPT FOR PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
  7. REPORT OF UNSAFE CONDITION OR HAZARD

 

POLICY STATEMENT

 

It is the belief of Elite HR Logistics that our people are our most important asset and the preservation of employee Safety and Health must remain a constant consideration in every phase of our business. We will provide the resources necessary to manage, control, or eliminate safety and health hazards.

 

All employees are responsible for working safely and productively, as well as recognition and awareness of hazards in their work areas. Employees are also responsible for following safe work practices, including the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) where necessary.

 

It is our belief that any Safety Program must have total employee involvement. Therefore, this plan has management’s highest priority, support, and participation.

 

PRODUCTION IS NOT SO URGENT THAT WE CANNOT TAKE TIME TO DO OUR WORK SAFELY.

 

__________________________________

Desiree Caldwell

 

GOALS

 

Safety begins at the top and goes downward throughout the company. The primary goal of Elite HR Logistics is to continue operating a profitable business while protecting employees from injuries, illness or harm. This can be achieved in part by delegating responsibility and accountability to all involved in this company's operation.

 

  • Responsibility: Having to answer for activities and results.

 

  • Accountability: The actions taken by management to insure the performance of responsibilities. In other words, to reach our goal of a safe workplace everyone needs to take responsibility and be held accountable.

 

Benefits of achieving our goals are:

 

  • Minimizing of injuries and accidents
  • Minimizing the loss of property and equipment
  • Elimination of potential fatalities
  • Elimination of potential permanent disabilities
  • Elimination of potential CAL-OSHA fines
  • Reductions in workers’ compensation costs
  • Reductions in operating costs
  • Having the best Safety and Health conditions possible in the workplace.

 

MANAGEMENT COMMITMENT

 

The management of Elite HR Logistics is committed to the company's safety policy, and to provide direction and motivation by:

 

  • Appointing Sandra Wetzel as our Safety Coordinator.
  • Establishing company safety goals and objectives.
  • Developing and implementing a written Safety and Health program.
  • Ensuring total commitment to the Safety and Health program.
  • Facilitating employees’ safety training.
  • Establishing responsibilities for management and employees to follow.
  • Ensuring that management and employees are held accountable for performance of their safety responsibilities.
  • Establishing and enforcing disciplinary procedures for employees.
  • Reviewing the Safety and Health program annually, and revising or updating as needed.

 

 ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITY

 

SAFETY COORDINATOR

 

Elite HR Logistics has designated Sandra Wetzel as our Safety Coordinator. The cell phone and office phone numbers are:

 

Office: (916) 484-4300

Cell: (916) 477-6634

 

It is the duty of the Safety Coordinator to assist the Manager and all other levels of Management in the initiation, education, and execution of an effective safety program including the following:

 

  • Reviewing the safety program with new employees.
  • Following up on recommendations, suggestions, etc., made at Safety Meetings.
  • Assisting employees in the execution of safety policies.
  • Conducting safety inspections on a periodic basis.
  • Addressing existing or potential hazards as needed.
  • Preparing accident reports and investigations.
  • Maintaining an adequate stock of first aid supplies and other safety equipment to insure their immediate availability.
  • Becoming familiar with CAL-OSHA regulations and local and state safety codes.
  • Emphasizing to employees that accidents create unnecessary personal and financial losses.

 

MANAGER

 

It is the responsibility of the Manager to establish a work environment that ensures that safety and health is managed in the same manner and with the same degree of emphasis as production, cost, and quality control, by:

 

  • Regularly emphasizing that accident and health hazard exposure prevention are not only moral responsibilities, but also a condition of employment.
  • Identifying procedures that could contribute to accidents which can result in injuries and property damage.
  • Participating in safety and health related activities, including routinely attending safety meetings, reviews of the facility, and correcting employee behavior that can result in accidents and injuries.
  • Spending time with each person hired explaining the safety policies and the hazards of his/her particular work.
  • Ensuring that initial orientation of "new hires" is carried out by Sandra Wetzel.
  • Not short-cutting safety for expediency, or allowing workers to do so.
  • Enforcing safety rules consistently, and following the company's discipline and enforcement procedures.
  • Conducting periodic workplace safety inspections and correcting noted safety violations.

 

EMPLOYEES

 

It is the duty of each and every employee to know the safety rules, and conduct their work in compliance with these rules. Disregard of the safety and health rules shall be grounds for disciplinary action up to and including termination. It is also the duty of each employee to make full use of the safeguards provided for their protection. Every employee will receive an orientation when hired and receive a copy of the work and safety rules that apply to their work duties.

Employee responsibilities include the following:

 

  • Reading, understanding and following safety and health rules and procedures.
  • Signing the Policies and Procedures Acknowledgement form.
  • Wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) at all times when working in areas where there is a possible danger of injury.
  • Wearing suitable work clothes as determined by the Manager.
  • Performing all tasks safely as directed by their Manager.
  • Reporting ALL injuries, no matter how slight to their Manager immediately, and seeking treatment promptly.
  • Knowing the location of first aid supplies, fire fighting equipment, and other safety devices.
  • Attending required safety and health meetings.
  • Not performing potentially hazardous tasks, or using any hazardous material until properly trained, and following all safety procedures when performing those tasks.
  • STOPPING AND ASKING QUESTIONS IF EVER IN DOUBT ABOUT THE SAFETY OF ANY OPERATION

 

 

DISCIPLINE AND ENFORCEMENT

 

Elite HR Logistics seeks to establish and maintain standards of employee conduct and supervisory practices which will support and promote safe and effective business operations. These supervisory practices include administering corrective action when employee unsafe performance or risky behavior jeopardizes this goal. This policy sets forth general guidelines for a corrective action process aimed to document and correct unsafe employee behavior. Major elements of this policy include:

 

  • Constructive criticism/instruction by the employee’s Manager to educate and inform employees of appropriate safety performance and behavior.

 

  • Correcting employee’s negative behavior to the extent required.

 

  • Informing the employee that continued violation of company safety policies may result in termination.

 

  • Written documentation of disciplinary warnings and corrective action taken.

 

Depending on the facts and circumstances involved with each situation, the company may choose any corrective action including immediate termination. However, in most circumstances the following steps will be followed:

 

  1. VERBAL WARNING informally documented, by Manager or Safety Coordinator for minor infractions of company safety rules. The Manager or Safety Coordinator must inform the employee what safety rule or policy was violated and how to correct the problem.
  2. WRITTEN WARNING, documented in employee’s file. Repeated minor infractions or a more substantial safety infraction requires issuance of a written warning. Every attempt should be made to re-educate the employee on the desired performance. The employee should acknowledge the warning by signing the document before it is placed in their personnel file.
  3. SUSPENSION, for three (3) working days if employee fails to appropriately respond or management determines the infraction is sufficiently serious.
  4. TERMINATION, for repeated or serious safety infractions.

 

 CONTROL OF HAZARDS

 

Where feasible, workplace hazards are prevented by effective design of the job. Where it is not feasible to eliminate such hazards, they must be controlled to prevent an unsafe or unhealthy exposure. Once a potential hazard is recognized, the elimination or control of the hazard must be done in a timely manner. These procedures include measures such as the following:

 

  • Maintaining all extension cords and electrical equipment in good working order.
  • Ensuring all guards and safety devices are working and in place.
  • Periodically inspecting the workplace for safety hazards.
  • Establishing a medical program that provides applicable first aid supplies in the workplace, as well as emergency phone numbers (911).
  • Addressing any and all safety hazards with employees.

 

FIRE PREVENTION

 

Fire prevention is an important part of protecting employees and company assets. Fire hazards must be controlled to prevent unsafe conditions. Once a potential hazard is recognized, it must be eliminated or controlled in a timely manner. The following fire prevention requirements must be met for each site:

 

  • One conspicuously located ABC fire extinguisher (or equivalent) for every floor.
  • One conspicuously located ABC fire extinguisher (or equivalent) for every 3000 sq/ft
  • A conspicuously located, ABC fire extinguisher for everywhere more than 5-gallons of flammable liquids or gas are stored.
  • The work place is free from accumulation of unneeded combustible materials.
  • No obstructions or combustible materials piled in the exits.
  • Fire extinguishers in the immediate vicinity where welding or cutting is being done.

 

 

TRAINING AND EDUCATION

 

Training is an essential component of an effective safety and health program addressing the responsibilities of both management and employees in the workplace. Training is most effective when incorporated into other education on performance requirements and job practices.

 

Training programs are provided as follows:

 

  • Initially when the safety and health plan is developed or upgraded
  • For all new employees before beginning work
  • When new equipment, materials, or processes are introduced
  • When procedures have been updated or revised
  • When incidents/accidents show that safety performance must be improved

 

Besides the standard training, employees should also be trained in the recognition of hazards – to be able to look at an operation and identify unsafe acts and conditions.

 

A list of typical hazards employees should be able to recognize may include:

 

  • Fall Hazards; Fall exposures from ladders (straight and step) and any other surface more than 6 feet above the floor.

 

  • Electrical Hazards; Damaged cords, outlets, overloads, extension cords, portable tools (broken casing or damaged wiring), grounding, metal boxes, switches, Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters(GFCI).

 

  • Housekeeping Issues; Exits, walkways, floors, trash, storage of materials (Hazardous and Non-Hazardous), trips/slips, uneven flooring, etc.

 

  • Fire Hazards; Oily-dirty Rags, combustibles, fuel gas cylinders, exits blocked, damaged electrical cords, etc.

 

  • Health Hazards; Loss of hearing from noisy environments, and eye injury due to flying objects, etc.

 

 SAFETY MEETINGS

 

Employees of Elite HR Logistics shall attend and participate in periodic safety meetings. The safety meeting shall be conducted by the Safety Coordinator.  Safety problems that have arisen or that are anticipated shall be discussed along with any other work site or operations topics. The meeting shall be kept a valuable educational experience by:

 

  • Keeping the meetings moving.
  • Starting and stopping on time.
  • Using illustrated material and demonstrations to make the point.
  • Discussing each topic thoroughly, providing handouts if possible.
  • Reviewing accidents, injuries, property losses, and “near misses”.

 

The Safety Coordinator must document the meetings using the appropriate form.

 

 

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT.

 

Elite HR Logistics will provide Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) as needed for each work assignment.

 

  • All Employees receiving PPE will be trained in its proper use.
  • Retraining will be conducted when new PPE is issued.
  • Training and retraining will be documented.
  • PPE is to be issued, used and maintained in a sanitary condition.
  • Employee owned PPE is not permitted on the job site.
  • A PPE Assessment Form will be used to select proper PPE for the job.
  • All PPE will be properly fitted where applicable.
  • Employees are to turn in defective or damaged PPE for new PPE.

 

RECORDKEEPING AND CAL-OSHA LOG REVIEW

 

In the event of a fatality (death on the job) or catastrophe (accident resulting in hospitalization of three or more workers) or serious injury (loss of any body part or hospitalization for 24 hours for anything other than observation) contact the Safety Coordinator, Sandra Wetzel. The office and cell-phone numbers are:

 

Office: (916) 484-4300                                                                                   Cell: (916) 477-6634

 

The Safety Coordinator will in turn report it to the nearest Cal-OSHA Regional District Office, within 8 hours after the occurrence.

 

If an injury or accident should occur, employees are to report the injury to their Manager as soon as possible. A log entry and summary report shall be maintained for every recordable injury and illness. The entry should be done within 7 days after the injury or illness has occurred. The CAL-OSHA 300 or equivalent shall be used for the recording.

 

An CAL-OSHA recordable injury or illness is defined as an injury resulting in loss of consciousness, days away from work, days of restricted work, or medical treatment beyond first aid.

 

First Aid includes:

 

  • Tetanus shots
  • Band-aids or butterfly bandages
  • Cleaning, flushing or soaking wounds
  • Ace bandages and wraps
  • Non-prescription drugs at non-prescription strength (Aspirin, Tylenol, Etc.)
  • Drilling fingernails/toenails
  • Eye patches, eye flushing and foreign body removal from eye with Q-tips
  • Finger guards
  • Hot or cold packs
  • Drinking fluids for heat stress

 

An annual summary of recordable injuries and illnesses must be posted at a conspicuous location in the workplace and contain the following information: Calendar year, company name-establishment name, establishment address, certifying signature, title, and date. If no injury or illness occurred in the year, zeroes must be entered on the total line at the bottom of the form.

 

The CAL-OSHA logs will be evaluated by management to determine trends or patterns in injuries in order to appropriately address hazards and implement prevention strategies.

 

ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

 

Manager Responsibilities

 

  • Provide first aid and/or call for emergency medical care if required.
  • If further medical treatment is required, arrange to have the injured employee transported to the medical facility.
  • Secure area, equipment and other personnel from injury and further damage.
  • Contact Safety Coordinator.

 

Safety Coordinator Responsibilities

 

  • Investigate the incident (injury) by gathering facts, interviewing the injured employee and any witnesses; taking pictures and physical measurements of incident site and equipment involved.
  • Complete an accident investigation report form.
  • Insure that corrective action to prevent a recurrence is taken.
  • Discuss incident, where appropriate, in safety and other employee meetings with the intent to prevent a recurrence.
  • Discuss incident with other front line supervisors and other management.
  • If the injury warrants time away from work, ensure that the absence is authorized by a physician and that you maintain contact with the employee while they remain off work.
  • Monitor status of employee(s) off work, maintain contact with employee and encourage return to work even if restrictions are imposed by the physician.
  • When injured employee(s) return to work they should not be allowed to return to work without “return to work” release forms from the physician. Review the release carefully and insure that you can accommodate the restrictions, and that the employee follows the restrictions indicated by the physician.

 

GENERAL CODE OF SAFE PRACTICES

 

General Safety

 

  • All injuries must be reported to your Manager.
  • Possession, use, or being under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs while on company property is strictly prohibited.  Violation of this policy is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment.
  • No employee is expected to undertake a job until that employee has received adequate training.
  • All employees shall be trained on the potential hazards that they could be exposed to and how to protect themselves.
  • No employee is required to work under conditions which are unsanitary, dangerous or hazardous to their health.
  • Only qualified, trained and authorized personnel are permitted to operate machinery or equipment.
  • No employee shall operate a fork lift truck until they have been safety certified and authorized by the company.
  • No machine should be operated without the proper machine guarding in place.
  • All hand and power tools and similar equipment, whether provided by the employer or the employee, shall be maintained in a safe condition.
  • Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head injury, excessive noise exposure, or potential eye and face injury shall be protected by Personal Protection Equipment (PPE).
  • In the event of an emergency evacuation, meet at your designated gathering point for a head count.  Do not leave the property until released by your Manager.

 

Lifting Procedures

 

  • Use smart lifting techniques.  Lift with your legs.  Do not bend at the waist for lifting.
  • Plan the move before lifting; ensure that you have an unobstructed pathway.
  • Test the weight of the load before lifting by pushing the load along its resting surface.
  • If the load is too heavy or bulky, use lifting and carrying aids such as hand trucks, dollies, pallet jacks and carts, or get assistance from a co-worker.
  • If assistance is required to perform a lift, coordinate and communicate your movements with those of your co-worker.
  • Position your feet 6 to 12 inches apart with one foot slightly in front of the other.
  • Face the load.
  • Bend at the knees, not at the back.
  • Keep your back straight.
  • Get a firm grip on the object using your hands and fingers. Use handles when they are present.
  • Hold the object as close to your body as possible.
  • While keeping the weight of the load in your legs, stand to an erect position.
  • Perform lifting movements smoothly and gradually; do not jerk the load.
  • If you must change direction while lifting or carrying the load, pivot your feet and turn your entire body. Do not twist at the waist.
  • Set down objects in the same manner as you picked them up, except in reverse.
  • Do not lift an object from the floor to a level above your waist in one motion. Set the load down on a table or bench and then adjust your grip before lifting it higher.
  • Never lift anything if your hands are greasy or wet.
  • Wear protective gloves when lifting objects that have sharp corners or jagged edges.

 

Ladders and Step Ladders

 

  • Do not use ladders that have loose rungs, cracked or split side rails, missing rubber foot pads, or are otherwise visibly damaged.
  • Keep ladder rungs clean and free of grease. Remove buildup of material such as dirt or mud.
  • Do not place ladders in a passageway or doorway without posting warning signs or cones that detour pedestrian traffic away from the ladder. Lock the doorway that you are blocking with the ladder and post signs that will detour traffic away from your work.
  • Allow only one person on the ladder at a time.
  • Face the ladder when climbing up or down it.
  • Maintain a three-point contact by keeping both hands and one foot or both feet and one hand on the ladder at all times when climbing up or down the ladder.
  • When performing work from a ladder, face the ladder and do not lean backward or sideways from the ladder. Do not jump from ladders or step stools.
  • Do not stand on tables, chairs, boxes or other improvised climbing devices to reach high places. Use the ladder or stepstool.
  • Do not stand on the top two rungs of any ladder.
  • Do not stand on a ladder that wobbles, or that leans to the left or right of center.
  • When using a straight or extension ladder, extend the top of the ladder at least 3 feet above the edge of the landing.
  • Secure the ladder in place by having another employee hold it if it cannot be tied to the structure.
  • Do not move a rolling ladder while someone is on it.
  • Do not place ladders on barrels, boxes, loose bricks, pails, concrete blocks or other unstable bases.
  • Do not carry items in your hands while climbing up or down a ladder.

 

WAREHOUSE CODE OF SAFE PRACTICES

 

OFFICE PERSONNEL

 

General Rules

 

  • Close drawers and doors immediately after use.
  • Open one file cabinet drawer at a time.
  • Put heavy files in the bottom drawers of file cabinets.
  • Use the handle when closing doors, drawers and files.
  • Store sharp objects, such as pens, pencils, letter openers or scissors in drawers or with the points down in a container.
  • Do not tilt the chair you are sitting in on its back two legs.
  • Use a cord cover or tape the cord down when running electrical or other cords across aisles, between desks or across entrances or exits.
  • Do not connect multiple electrical devices into a single outlet.
  • Keep doors in hallways fully open or fully closed.
  • Use a staple remover, not your fingers, for removing staples.

 

Step Stools

 

  • Allow only one person on the step stool at a time.
  • Face the step stool when climbing up or down.
  • When performing work from a step stool, face the step stool and do not lean backward or sideways from the step stool.
  • Do not place a step stool on boxes, books, or other unstable bases.

 

WAREHOUSE PERSONNEL

 

General Rules

 

  • Follow the instructions on the label and in the corresponding Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for each chemical product used in your workplace.
  • Move slowly when approaching blind corners.
  • No jumping off docks or trailers. Use the stairs or a ramp.

 

Housekeeping

 

  • Do not place work materials such as boxes or empty pallets in walkways and passageways.
  • Do not block or obstruct stairwells, exits or accesses to safety and emergency equipment such as fire extinguishers or fire alarms.
  • Do not try to kick objects out of pathways. Push or carry them out of the way.
  • Do not let items overhang from shelves into walkways.
  • Place products that are to be depalletized by hand on the lower or middle pallet racks.
  • Stack items on pallets so that they lie flat and do not lean against each other.

 

Packaging and Crates

 

  • Remove or bend nails and staples from crates before unpacking.
  • When cutting shrink wrap with a blade, always cut away from you and your co-workers.
  • When opening cartons use safety box cutters. Do not cut with the blade extended beyond the guard.

 

Handling Loads

 

  • If the load is too heavy or bulky, use lifting and carrying aids such as hand trucks, dollies, pallet jacks and carts, or get assistance from a co-worker.
  • If assistance is required to perform a lift, coordinate and communicate your movements with those of your co-worker.
  • Wear protective gloves when lifting objects with sharp corners or jagged edges.
  • Move containerized items by pushing them rather than carrying them.
  • When manually stocking shelves, position the materials to be shelved slightly in front of you, so you do not have to twist when lifting and stacking materials.

 

Manual Steel Drum Handling

 

  • Roll drums by pushing against the middle of the drum with both hands.
  • Use a cradle-type drum tilter when tilting drums.
  • Do not try to up-end a full drum by yourself.
  • Do not roll a full drum up a skid by yourself.
  • Chock both sides of a drum when storing the drum in a horizontal position.

 

Forklifts

 

Do not use forklift if any of the following conditions exist:

  • The mast has broken or cracked weld-points.
  • The roller tracks are not greased or the chains are not free to travel.
  • Forks are unequally spaced or cracks exist along the blade or at the heels.
  • Hydraulic fluid levels are low.
  • Hydraulic line and fitting have excessive wear or are crimped.
  • Fluid is leaking from the lift or the tilt cylinders.
  • The hardware on the cylinders is loose.
  • Tires are excessively worn, split or have missing tire material.
  • Air filled tires are not filled to the operating pressure indicated on the tire.
  • Batteries have cracks or holes, uncapped cells, frayed cables, broken cable insulation, loose connections or clogged vent caps.

Starting the Forklift

 

  • Apply the foot brake and shift gears to neutral before turning the key.

 

Picking Up a Load

 

  • "Square-up" on the center of the load and approach it straight on with the forks in the travel position.
  • Stop when the tips of your forks are about a foot from the load.
  • Level the forks and slowly drive forward until the load is resting against the backrest of the mast.
  • Lift the load high enough to clear whatever is under it.
  • Back up about one foot, then slowly and evenly tilt the mast backwards to stabilize the load.

 

Putting a Load Down

 

  • "Square-up" and stop about one foot from desired location.
  • Level the forks and drive to the loading spot.
  • Slowly lower the load to the floor.
  • Tilt the forks slightly forward so that you do not hook the load.
  • When the path behind you is clear of obstructions, back straight out until the forks have cleared the pallet.

 

Stacking One Load on Top of Another

 

  • Stop about one foot away from the loading area and lift the mast high enough to clear the top of the stack.
  • Slowly move forward until the load is squarely over the top of the stack.
  • Level the forks and lower the mast until the load is no longer supported by the forks.
  • Look over both shoulders for obstructions and back straight out if the path is clear.

 

Forklift Safety Rules

 

  • Do not exceed the lift capacity of the forklift. Read the lift capacity plate on the forklift if you are unsure.
  • Follow the manufacturer's guidelines concerning changes in the lift capacity before adding an attachment to a forklift.
  • Lift the load an inch or two to test for stability: If the rear wheels are not in firm contact with the floor, take a lighter load or use a forklift with a higher lift capacity.
  • Do not raise or lower a load while you are en route. Wait until you are in the loading area and have stopped before raising or lowering the load.
  • After picking up a load, adjust the forks so that the load is tilted slightly backward for added stability.
  • Drive with the load at a ground clearance height of 4-6 inches at the tips and 2 inches at the heels in order to clear most uneven surfaces and debris.
  • Drive at a walking pace and apply brakes slowly to stop when driving on slippery surfaces such as icy or wet floors.
  • Approach railroad tracks at a 45 angle.
  • Do not drive over objects in your pathway.
  • Do not drive into an area with a ceiling height that is lower than the height of the mast or overhead guard.
  • Steer wide when making turns.
  • Do not drive up to anyone standing or working in front of a fixed object such as a wall.
  • Do not drive along the edge of an unguarded elevated surface such as a loading dock or staging platform.
  • Obey all traffic rules and signs.
  • Sound horn when approaching blind corners, doorways or aisles to alert other operators and pedestrians.
  • Do not exceed a safe working speed of five miles per hour; slow down in congested areas.
  • Stay a minimum distance of three truck lengths from other operating mobile equipment.
  • Drive in reverse and use a signal person when your vision is blocked by the load.
  • Look in the direction that you are driving; proceed when you have a clear path.
  • Do not use bare forks as a man-lift platform.
  • Do not drive the forklift while people are on the attached man-lift platform.
  • Drive loaded forklifts forward up ramps.
  • Raise the forks an additional two inches to avoid hitting or scraping the ramp surface as you approach the ramp.
  • Drive loaded forklifts in reverse when driving down a ramp.
  • Drive unloaded forklifts in reverse when going up a ramp and forward when going down a ramp.
  • Do not attempt to turn around on a ramp.
  • Do not use "Reverse" to brake.
  • Lower the mast completely, turn off the engine and set the parking brake before leaving your forklift.

 

Loading Docks

 

  • Keep the forklift clear of the dock edge while vehicles are backing up to the dock.
  • Do not begin loading or unloading until the supply truck has come to a complete stop, the engine has been turned off, the dock lock has been engaged and the wheels have been chocked.
  • Attach the bridge or dock plate before driving the forklift into the truck.
  • Do not drive the forklift into a truck bed that has soft or loose decking or other unstable flooring.
  • Drive straight across the bridge plates when entering or exiting the trailer.
  • Use dock lights or headlights when working in a dark trailer.

 

Hand Trucks

 

  • Tip the load slightly forward so that the tongue of the hand truck goes under the load.
  • Push the tongue of the hand truck all the way under the load to be moved.
  • Keep the center of gravity of the load as low as possible by placing heavier objects below the lighter objects.
  • When loading hand trucks, keep your feet clear of the wheels.
  • Push the load so that the weight will be carried by the axle and not the handles. The operator should only balance and push.
  • If your view is obstructed, use a spotter to assist in guiding the load.
  • Do not walk backward with the hand truck, unless going up stairs or ramps.
  • When going down an incline, keep the hand truck in front of you so that it can be controlled at all times.
  • Move hand trucks at a walking pace.
  • Store hand trucks with the tongue under a pallet, shelf, or table.
  • Do not exceed the manufacturer's load rated capacity. Read the capacity plate on the hand truck if you are unsure.

 

Pallet Jacks

 

  • Only employer authorized personnel may operate pallet jacks.
  • Do not exceed the manufacturer's load rated capacity. Read the lift capacity plate on the pallet jack if you are unsure.
  • Do not use pallets or skids that are cracked or split or have other visible damage.
  • Do not ride on pallet jacks.
  • Start and stop gradually to prevent the load from slipping.
  • Pull manual pallet jacks; push when going down an incline or passing close to walls or obstacles.
  • If your view is obstructed, use a spotter to assist in guiding the load.
  • Stop the pallet jack if anyone gets in your way.
  • Do not place your feet under the pallet jack when it is moving.
  • Keep your feet and other body parts clear of pallet before releasing the load.

 

Order Pickers

 

  • Only employer authorized personnel may operate Order Pickers.
  • Do not operate an Order Picker without the operator's safety belt or lanyard in place.
  • Do not remove the safety belt or lanyard when the Order Picker is in the raised position.
  • Do not allow personnel to stand under the Order Picker while it is in the raised position.
  • Drive the Order Picker at a walking pace.
  • Do not drive with the Order Picker in the raised position.

 

Hoists

 

  • Do not use load hooks that are cracked, bent or broken.
  • Do not exceed the rated load capacity as specified by the manufacturer.
  • Do not leave the hoist unattended with a hoisted load.
  • Do not hoist loads over people.

 

MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL

 

General

 

  • Replace the guards before starting machines, after making adjustments or repairs.
  • Do not wear loose clothing or jewelry in the machine shop.
  • Long hair must be contained under a hat or hair net, regardless of gender.
  • Follow the instructions on the label and in the corresponding Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for each chemical product used in your workplace.

 

Batteries

 

  • Do not lay tools or metal parts on top of a battery.
  • Turn battery chargers off prior to connecting the cables to the battery posts.
  • Position the fork truck so that the battery is aligned with the rollers or the hoist used for moving it and engage the fork truck brake before removing the battery and placing it onto the charging rack.
  • Set the brakes on the lift truck prior to connecting the charging cables to the battery on the lift truck.
  • Do not smoke in the battery charging areas.
  • Manually flip the fan motor switch to the "On" position before operating the battery charger.
  • Do not use a screwdriver to test the charge of a battery.

 

Electrical Powered Tools

 

  • Do not use power equipment or tools on which you have not been trained.
  • Keep power cords away from path of drills, saws and grinders.
  • Do not use cords that have splices, exposed wires or cracked or frayed ends.
  • Do not carry plugged in equipment or tools with your finger on the switch.
  • Do not carry equipment or tools by the cord.
  • Disconnect the tool from the outlet by pulling on the plug, not the cord.
  • Turn the tool off before plugging or unplugging it.
  • Do not use extension cords or other grounded three-pronged power cords that have the ground prong removed or broken off.
  • Do not use an adapter such as a cheater plug that eliminates the ground.
  • Do not run extension cords through doorways or through holes in ceilings, walls or floors.

Grinders

 

  • Wear safety glasses, goggles or face shields when operating a grinder.
  • Do not continue to work if your safety glasses become fogged. Stop work and clean the glasses until the lenses are clear and defogged.
  • Do not use grinding wheels that have chips, cracks or grooves.
  • Adjust the tongue guard so that it is no more than 1/4 inch from the grinding wheel.
  • Do not try to stop the wheel with your hand, even if you are wearing gloves.

 

DELIVERY PERSONNEL 

 

Hand Trucks

 

  • Tip the load slightly forward so that the tongue of the hand truck goes under the load.
  • Push the tongue of the hand truck all the way under the load to be moved.
  • Keep the center of gravity of the load as low as possible by placing heavier objects below the lighter objects.
  • When loading hand trucks, keep your feet clear of the wheels.
  • Push the load so that the weight will be carried by the axle and not the handles. The operator should only balance and push.
  • Place the load so that it will not slip, shift or fall. Use straps, if provided, to secure the load.
  • If your view is obstructed, use a spotter to assist in guiding the load.
  • Do not walk backward with the hand truck, unless going up stairs or ramps.
  • When going down an incline, keep the hand truck in front of you so that it can be controlled at all times.
  • Move hand trucks at a walking pace.
  • Do not try to catch the load if it is falling or slipping. Get out of the way.

 

Vehicle Safety

 

  • Shut all doors and fasten your seat belt before moving the vehicle.
  • Obey all traffic patterns and signs at all times.
  • Maintain a three-point contact using both hands and one foot or both feet and one hand when climbing into and out of trucks.

 

HEARING PROTECTION PLAN

 

SCOPE AND APPLICATION

 

The objective of this Hearing Conservation Program is to eliminate noise induced occupational hearing loss. This program applies to all persons working in areas or with equipment that noise exposure exceeds an 8-hr Time Weighted Average (TWA) of 85 DBA, slow response, or higher.  All departments affected will maintain a copy of this program.

 

RESPONSIBLITIES

 

Management’s Responsibilities:

 

  • To budget for cost of the audiometric testing, purchasing and hearing protection devices.
  • To ensure Managers are knowledgeable on this program and to supervise the use and care of the hearing protection by their employees.
  • To determine where high noise levels exist in operations.
  • Assign a program coordinator

 

Manager’s Responsibilities:

 

  • Recipient of assignment of program coordinator
  • Coordinating Annual Testing
  • Maintaining required records
  • Employee Training
  • Coordinating Noise Surveys

 

 Employees’ Responsibilities:

 

  • Wear hearing protection as they have been trained
  • Notify their Manager if they notice increase/decrease of noise, change in the environment
  • Daily care and maintenance of hearing protection.

 

NOISE MONITORING:

 

Sound surveys will be conducted to determine occupational noise levels that employees are exposed to. This may be accomplished by the use of sound level meters and personal dosimeters.  In addition, a sound level survey will be conducted whenever new equipment is installed, a change in equipment or process or controls affects the noise levels, or whenever there are any significant changes in the work place that affect the noise levels.

 

Results of the surveys and monitoring will be communicated to the effected employee.  Records of all noise monitoring will be maintained permanently.

All areas with noise levels exceeding 85dBA will have caution signs posted to inform employees of the high noise level in the area and that hearing protection is required.

 

EMPLOYEE AUDIOMETRIC TESTING

 

All employees whose exposures equal or exceed an 8-hr time weighted average of 85dBA and are required to work in posted high noise areas are required to take a baseline audiogram at the time of employment. Licensed or certified audiologist, otolaryngologist or other physician who is certified by the Council of Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation will perform this test. This will be at no cost to the employee.

 

New employees should be tested within 1 month of employment. The hiring Manager will arrange testing in coordination with the program coordinator.  The results of the hearing test are used solely to determine a baseline.

 

All employees working in posted high noise areas are required to take an annual hearing test.   Scheduling will allow employees to be tested during normal working hours. Managers should make the necessary schedule and/or staffing arrangements to allow employees the opportunity to be tested.

 

In order to obtain a valid test, managers shall ensure that employees being tested have not been exposed to occupational noise in excess of 85dBA for 14 hours prior to testing.  This can be accomplished by strictly enforcing the use of hearing protection in high noise areas.

 

A letter will be sent to all employees notifying them of the results of their hearing test.    The technician at the medical office will monitor employee audiograms and results. The technician will then communicate any changes to the employee and program coordinator.

 

Employees with a Standard Threshold Shift (STS) shall be notified of the threshold shift within 21 days from the date the program coordinator is made aware of the STS.  Each employee with a STS will receive individual counseling from the program coordinator within this time frame.

 

Counseling will consist of the specific requirements of 1910.95 (g) and employees are required to sign a form acknowledging that these requirements are met.

 

PERSONAL HEARING PROTECTION

 

The use of hearing protection is mandatory in all posted high noise areas.  Each department is responsible for providing hearing protection for their employees.  Several types of hearing protection will be approved for use and employees will be given the opportunity to choose the type of hearing protection they wish to use. 

 

Disposable earplugs should be readily available for use by any visitors to high noise areas.  Department managers should ensure that visitors entering their area are informed of the hazards present and the required use of hearing protection.

 

EMPLOYEE TRAINING

 

OSHA requires that all employees exposed to 85dBA or above must receive training on an annual basis.  The training will include the following:  the effects of noise on hearing, the disadvantages and advantages of hearing protectors, the types, selection, use, and care of those protectors, and the purpose of audiometric testing and procedures involved.  

 

DATA MANAGEMENT

 

Employee audiograms and sound surveys will be analyzed by outside consultants who will provide testing and survey results and recommendations to the program manager.  The program coordinator will maintain sound survey results and recommendations. 

 

Employee audiograms, medical referrals, and threshold counseling forms will be kept in the employee's medical surveillance file in the human resources department.  Information in the medical surveillance files is not to be released without the employee's permission.

 

 

APPENDIX A – SPECIFIC ASSIGNED RESPONSIBILITIES

 

The following are specific assigned responsibilities under this Hearing Conservation Program.  The purpose of these assigned responsibilities is to increase ownership in the program at all levels as well as ensuring implementation and compliance with the elements of the program.

 

Associates identified in each tier group are responsible

for performing those specific assignments.

 

Manager:

Assignment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manager:

Assignment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Employee:

Assignment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Others:

Assignment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX B - TRAINING ATTENDANCE SHEET

 

HEARING CONSERVATION PROGRAM

 

29 CFR 1910.95

 

DATE:

 

INSTRUCTOR:

 

TRAINING A/V MATERIALS:

 

 

 

NAME:

DEPARTMENT

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  1.  

 

  1.  

 

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  1.  

 

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RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PLAN

 

Elite HR Logistics is responsible for updating and administering all aspects of this plan. In addition, Elite HR Logistics shall carry out an annual review, with training, of the effectiveness of the plan.

 

  • Sandra Wetzel is designated as the program coordinator.
  • Respiratory equipment is supplied by the company at no cost to the employee.
  • Respirators shall be chosen based on identification and evaluation of a hazard, in accordance with the NIOSH Respirator Decision Logic.
  • Hazard identification shall include a review of the chemicals in use with respect to their hazards, the availability of respirators for the chemical, and the potential of exposures.
  • If any air monitoring has been done to determine the level of exposures, this data will be considered in respirator selection.
  • Only NIOSH approved respirators shall be used.  Parts and cartridges shall be used only with the mask for which they were intended.  Any mixing and matching negates NIOSH approval.
  • If there is any doubt about the appropriateness of a respirator for a particular exposure, or about NIOSH approval of a particular respirator, advice will be obtained from NIOSH.
  • Persons will not be assigned tasks requiring the use of respirators unless they are physically able to perform work and use the equipment as determined by a qualified physician.
  • Medical evaluation for fit testing is to be confidential and conducted during normal working hours.  The results should be understandable, and the employee given a chance to discuss the results with the physician or other licensed healthcare professional.
  • The respirators user's medical status shall be reviewed as required by OSHA.
  • Each individual who must wear a respirator shall be fit tested by a qualified individual and a respirator which fits each individual shall be available.
  • The individual shall be given written notification of the brand and model which she/he can wear.
  • Individuals shall conduct positive and negative pressure fit test checks each time a respirator is donned to assure proper protection.
  • Positive Pressure Test:  Close off the exhalation valves (usually found on the bottom or the center of the respirator) with your hand, and breathe into the face piece.  The fit is considered satisfactory if a slight pressure can build up inside the face piece without air leaking.
  • Negative Pressure Test:  Close off the inlet openings of the cartridge by covering them with the palm of the hand.  Some respirators require that the filter holder be removed to seal off the intake valve.  Inhale gently so that a vacuum occurs within the face piece. Hold your breath for about 5 seconds. If the vacuum remains, and no inward leakage is detected, the respirator is properly fit.
  • Fit testing for tight fitting pieces will be done by qualitative methods.
  • A tight fitting piece cannot be worn if the seal is broken by facial hair, glasses, etc.
  • Employees must leave the area requiring respiratory protection to change cartridges; or if they detect a breakthrough in the fitting.

 

Cleaning and Disinfection

 

All respirators must be cleaned after each use (shift).

 

Cleaning Procedures:  Cleaning must be done away from the area requiring respiratory protection.

  • Remove all filters, cartridges, and head-bands and disassemble the major respirator parts.
  • Wash all respirator parts (except cartridges and elastic headbands) in water with a cleaner-disinfectant solution, at about 120°F.  Use a hand brush to remove dirt if necessary.
  • Rinse parts in warm water until all traces of detergent and disinfectant are gone. (to prevent dermatitis)
  • Air dry in a clean area.
  • Inspect all parts including valves and head straps.  Replace all defective parts with the proper replacement parts.
  • Reassemble the respirator and insert new filters or cartridges.  Make sure they are sealed properly.
  • Place the clean respirator in a new plastic bag and seal it for storage.

 

Inspection

 

Respirators shall be routinely inspected before and after each use, and during the cleaning process.  Emergency equipment, not used routinely shall be inspected after each use, and monthly.

 

 Air-purifying respirators

Rubber face piece

  • Dirt, cracks, tears, or holes; obtain a new face piece.
  • Distortion; allow face piece to sit free from any constraints and see if distortion disappears.  If not, obtain a new face piece.
  • Cracked, scratched, or loose fitting lenses; contact manufacturer to see if replacement is possible.  Otherwise, obtain a new face piece.
  • Inflexibility of rubber face piece; replace face piece.

 

Head straps

  • Breaks or tears; replace head straps.
  • Loss of elasticity; replace head straps.
  • Broken or malfunctioning buckles or attachments; obtain new buckles.
  • Excessively worn separations on the head harness which might allow the face piece to slip; replace head strap.

 

Inhalation and exhalation valves

  • Detergent residue, dust particles or dirt on valve or valve seat; Clean residue with soap and water.
  • Cracks, tears, or distortion in the valve cover material or valve seat; replace valve cover.  Contact manufacturer for instructions on valve seat replacement.
  • Missing or defective valve cover; replace valve cover; obtain from manufacturer.

 

Filter elements

  • Appropriate for hazard and approved.
  • Missing or worn gaskets; replace gaskets.
  • Worn threads on filter and face piece; replace filter or face piece as appropriate.
  • Cracks or dents in filter housing; replace filter.
  • Deterioration of gas mask canister harness; replace harness.
  • Check end-of-service-life indicator, if present, and expiration of shelf-life date on cartridge or canister.

 

Supplied air respirators

 

If there is a tight-fitting face piece, use the procedures for air-purifying respirators, except those pertaining to the air-purifying elements.  If the device has a hood, helmet, blouse, or full suit:

  • Examine the hood, blouse, or suit for rips, tears, and seam integrity.
  • Examine the protective headgear for general condition, with emphasis on the suspension inside the headgear.
  • Examine the protective face shield, if any, for cracks or breaks or impaired vision.

Self-Contained breathing apparatus (SCBA)

SCBA shall be inspected monthly and after each use.  In addition to the above:

 

  • The high pressure cylinder of compressed air is fully charged.
  • On closed circuit SCBA, a fresh canister of carbon dioxide sorbent is installed.

 

On open circuit SCBA, recharge the cylinder if less than 80% of the useful service time remains.

  • Regulator and warning devices are functioning.
  • Tightness of connections.

A record shall be kept of inspection dates and findings for respirators maintained for emergency use.

 

Storage

 

  • Clean respirators must be stored to protect them against dust, sunlight, heat, extreme cold, excessive moisture or damaging chemicals.
  • Respirators shall be stored in resealable plastic bags in a convenient, clean and sanitary location.  Masks should be stored in a single layer with the face piece and exhalation valve in a more or less normal position to prevent the rubber or plastic from becoming permanently distorted.
  • Cartridges shall be stored in the same location, but not attached to respirators.  They shall be segregated by type.

 

Maintenance and Repair

 

  • Shall be done by experienced, qualified persons with parts designed for the respirator.

Provisions for Supplied Air Respirators

  • Compressed air shall meet the requirements of the specification for Grade D breathing air described in Compressed Gas Association Commodity Specification G-7.1-1966.
  • Cylinders shall be tested and maintained as prescribed in the Shipping Container Specification Regulations of DPT (49 CFR Part 178).

 

Additional Provisions for Air Line Respirators

 

The compressor for supplying air shall be equipped with necessary safety and standby devices.  A breathing air type compressor shall be used. Compressors shall be constructed and situated so as to avoid entry of contaminated air into the system and suitable in-line air purifying sorbent beds and filters installed to further assure breathing air quality.  A receiver of sufficient capacity to enable the respirator wearer to escape from a contaminated atmosphere in event of compressor failure, and alarms to indicate compressor failure and overheating shall be installed in the system.  If an oil lubricated compressor is used, it shall have a high temperature or carbon monoxide alarm, or both.  If only a high-temperature is used, the air from the compressor shall be frequently tested for carbon monoxide to insure that it meets specifications.

Airline couplings shall be incompatible with outlets for other gas systems to prevent inadvertent servicing of airline respirators with non-respirable gases or oxygen.

Breathing gas containers shall be marked in accordance with American -50- National Standard Method of Marking Portable Compressed Gas Containers to Identify the Material contained, Z48.1 - 1954;  Federal Specification BB-A-1034a, June 21, 1968, Air, Compressed for Breathing Purposes; or Interim Federal Specification GG-B-00675b, April 27, 1965, Breathing Apparatus, Self-Contained.

 

Training

 

All employees who use respirators shall be instructed in:

  • the importance of correct selection and use of respirators
  • correct use and consequences if improper use
  • care and storage
  • how to achieve a proper fit each time a respirator is donned
  • limitations of respirators in use
  • demonstration and practice in how a respirator should be worn, how to adjust it, and how to determine if it fits properly
  • Cleaning, inspection, repair and storage, so they can judge if their respirators have been appropriately treated.

 

Employees responsible for cleaning and inspection shall be instructed in how to conduct these operations.

Training shall be conducted initially when it is determined that an employee can and shall wear a respirator, and whenever a non-user becomes a user. 

Refresher training shall be conducted annually.

 

FORKLIFT SAFETY POLICY

 

Only trained and certified operators may operate forklift equipment at Elite HR Logistics.  Operators will receive training by a qualified instructor at a certified vendor.  Formal instruction will include lectures, discussion, interactive computer learning, videos, and written materials. Practical training involves instructor demonstrations and trainee exercises including operating instructions, controls, capacity/stability, refueling, load stability, etc.  Operator evaluation by testing is required.

 

Mandatory refresher training shall be provided when unsafe operations are observed, after an accident, if operation a different vehicle type, changes in conditions, etc.  All operators will be evaluated every three years. 

 

Daily Pre-Use Safety Inspection

 

Do not use forklift if any of the following conditions exist:

 

  • The mast has broken or cracked weld-points.
  • The roller tracks are not greased or the chains are not free to travel.
  • Forks are unequally spaced or cracks exist along the blade or at the heels.
  • Hydraulic fluid levels are low.
  • Hydraulic line and fitting have excessive wear or are crimped.
  • Fluid is leaking from the lift or the tilt cylinders.
  • The hardware on the cylinders is loose.
  • Tires are excessively worn, split or have missing tire material.
  • Air filled tires are not filled to the operating pressure indicated on the tire.
  • Batteries have cracks or holes, uncapped cells, frayed cables, broken cable insulation, loose connections or clogged vent caps.

 

Starting the Forklift

 

  • Apply the foot brake and shift gears to neutral before turning the key.

 

Picking Up a Load

 

  • "Square-up" on the center of the load and approach it straight on with the forks in the travel position.
  • Stop when the tips of your forks are about a foot from the load.
  • Level the forks and slowly drive forward until the load is resting against the backrest of the mast.
  • Lift the load high enough to clear whatever is under it.
  • Back up about one foot, and then slowly and evenly tilt the mast backwards to stabilize the load.

 

Putting a Load Down

 

  • "Square-up" and stop about one foot from desired location.
  • Level the forks and drive to the loading spot.
  • Slowly lower the load to the floor.
  • Tilt the forks slightly forward so that you do not hook the load.
  • When the path behind you is clear of obstructions, back straight out until the forks have cleared the pallet.

 

Stacking One Load on Top of Another

 

  • Stop about one foot away from the loading area and lift the mast high enough to clear the top of the stack.
  • Slowly move forward until the load is squarely over the top of the stack.
  • Level the forks and lower the mast until the load is no longer supported by the forks.
  • Look over both shoulders for obstructions and back straight out if the path is clear.

 

Forklift Safety Rules

 

  • The operator must verify trailer chocks, supports, and dock plates are in place prior to loading/unloading trailers.
  • Do not exceed the lift capacity of the forklift. Read the lift capacity plate on the forklift if you are unsure.
  • Follow the manufacturer's guidelines concerning changes in the lift capacity before adding an attachment to a forklift.
  • Lift the load an inch or two to test for stability: If the rear wheels are not in firm contact with the floor, take a lighter load or use a forklift with a higher lift capacity.
  • Do not raise or lower a load while you are enroute. Wait until you are in the loading area and have stopped before raising or lowering the load.
  • After picking up a load, adjust the forks so that the load is tilted slightly backward for added stability.
  • Drive with the load at a ground clearance height of 4-6 inches at the tips and 2 inches at the heels in order to clear most uneven surfaces and debris.
  • Drive at a walking pace and apply brakes slowly to stop when driving on slippery surfaces such as icy or wet floors.
  • Approach railroad tracks at a 45 angle.
  • Do not drive over objects in your pathway.
  • Do not drive into an area with a ceiling height that is lower than the height of the mast or overhead guard.
  • Steer wide when making turns.
  • Do not drive up to anyone standing or working in front of a fixed object such as a wall.
  • Do not drive along the edge of an unguarded elevated surface such as a loading dock or staging platform.
  • Obey all traffic rules and signs.
  • Sound horn when approaching blind corners, doorways or aisles to alert other operators and pedestrians.
  • Do not exceed a safe working speed of five miles per hour; slow down in congested areas.
  • Stay a minimum distance of three truck lengths from other operating mobile equipment.
  • Drive in reverse and use a signal person when your vision is blocked by the load.
  • Look in the direction that you are driving; proceed when you have a clear path.
  • Do not use bare forks as a man-lift platform.
  • Do not drive the forklift while people are on the attached man-lift platform.
  • Drive loaded forklifts forward up ramps.
  • Raise the forks an additional two inches to avoid hitting or scraping the ramp surface as you approach the ramp.
  • Drive loaded forklifts in reverse when driving down a ramp.
  • Drive unloaded forklifts in reverse when going up a ramp and forward when going down a ramp.
  • Do not attempt to turn around on a ramp.
  • Do not use "Reverse" to brake.
  • Lower the mast completely, turn off the engine and set the parking brake before leaving your forklift.

 

FALL PROTECTION PLAN

 

Elite HR Logistics complies with the Federal Regulations which applies to employees who are exposed to a hazard of falling from a location 6 feet or more in height, an appropriate fall protection program is in place to ensure that fall arrest or restraint systems are used to safeguard the exposed persons from serious injury or death.

 

A written Fall Protection Work Plan is required for all construction, demolition, maintenance, and repair work. This includes lifts and booms which elevate personnel.

 

Written protection plans are not required, but are recommended for other settings where fall protection is warranted. Written plans are not required where permanent guardrail systems are in place and are the only fall protection required.

 

  1. Responsibilities

 

It is the responsibility of Sandra Wetzel to ensure that fall protection plans are available for areas under their purview.  They shall also ensure that appropriate fall arrest and/or restraint equipment is available, that staff are trained, and that compliance with fall protection procedures is enforced.

 

All employees shall comply with the written fall protection procedures.  Sandra Wetzel shall be responsible for providing and updating company-wide procedures and assisting with implementation of the program.  Contact Sandra Wetzel for assistance in training or equipment evaluation.

 

  1. Fall Protection Work Plan

 

The fall protection work plan described in this document shall consist of the following items, in accordance with Federal regulations. The fall protection plan shall be available on the work site for inspection.

 

  • Identification of all fall hazards in the work area.
  • Description of the method of fall arrest (catch a person if falling) or restraint (prevent a person from falling).
  • Description of the correct procedures for assembly, maintenance, inspection, and disassembly of the fall protection system to be used.
  • Description of the correct procedures for handling, storing, and securing tools and materials.
  • Description of the method of providing overhead protection for workers, students, or visitors who may be in or pass through the work area.
  • Description of the method of prompt, safe removal of injured workers.

 

 

 

  1. Training

 

Prior to allowing employees to work in areas where fall hazards exist, they shall be trained and instructed in the fall protection plan. Training shall be documented and available. Re-training shall be provided when the following are noted:

 

  • Deficiencies in training.
  • Work place changes.
  • Fall protection systems or equipment changes that render previous training obsolete.

 

As described above, it is available from Sandra Wetzel.

 

  1. Inspection

 

All fall protection equipment will meet the requirements of applicable ANSI, ASTM, or OSHA requirements.  Prior to use, the fall protection devices and systems are to be inspected to ensure they meet requirements and are functioning properly. A competent person of identifying hazards and having the authority to take prompt, corrective action shall inspect.

 

  1. Planning

 

Each fall protection system is to be planned before it is put into use.  Site specific fall protection plans shall be developed by a qualified person.  Suitable anchorage points must be evaluated, if included. If anchorage points must be installed immediately prior to use, a registered professional engineer with experience in designing fall protection systems, or another qualified person with appropriate education and experience should design them. If anchor points are devised from existing structures, a qualified person must evaluate such anchor points.

 

  1. Incident/Accident Investigation

 

Incident/Accident investigations shall be conducted to evaluate the fall protection plan for potential updates to practices, procedures or training in order to prevent reoccurrence

 

  1. Records

 

A copy of each fall protection plan is filed in our office.  A copy is kept on-site during all work performed.

 

 

FALL PROTECTION WORK PLAN

 

PROCEDURE:

 

Provide written documentation as indicated below.

Inspect equipment prior to use.

Train all employees as required. Inform contractors.

 

Keep plan on-site during work duration.

 

Specific Work Area: _____________________________________

Work Description: _______________________________________

Work order Number: ____________________________

Department: ____________________________________________

Prepared by: ____________________________________________

Date Prepared: ___________________

Duration of Work: ____________ to _______________

Reviewed by: __________________________________

Date reviewed: _________________________________

 

Identify Fall Hazards

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Fall Restraint:

 

Guardrails, Safety belts or harness attached to rigged restraint lines,

Warning line system for a low pitch (4 in 12 or less) roof -

Barrier and safety monitor near edge. Prohibited on steep roofs.

 

Fall Arrest:

 

Full body harness (Class III), horizontal/vertical lines, lanyards

Safety nets

Catch platform installed within 10 vertical ft. of the work area

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Monitor Name: __________________

Training in Monitoring: ______________________

 

Describe The Correct Procedures For Assembly And Disassembly Of The Fall Protection System:

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Describe The Correct Procedures For Maintenance Of The Fall Protection System:

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Describe The Correct Procedures For Inspection Of The Fall Protection System:

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Describe The Correct Procedures For Handling, Storing, And Securing Tools And Materials:

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Describe The Method Of Providing Overhead Protection For Persons Who May Be In Or Pass Through The Work Area:

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Emergency Response/Injured Person Removal and Assistance:

 

  • Call 911 from an accessible telephone.

 

  • Stay at the site until emergency assistance arrives. Provide first aid as possible and necessary.

 

  • Do not attempt to move or remove an injured worker unless it can be done safely.

 

  • After any job-related accident, file an accident report available from your supervisor.

 

Describe Specific Emergency Response Procedures (Optional)

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

FALL PROTECTION WORK PLAN ATTACHMENT

 

PROCEDURE:

 

Document each date the fall protection plan is used.

Review the plan and ensure it is correct.

Inspect equipment prior to use and check box

Inform contractors if required and check box or indicate Not Applicable (NA)

Train all employees as required before plan is used and list names.

 

Keep plan on-site during work duration and check appropriate boxes

 

Print the name of the supervisor reviewing this plan and initial that the plan is implemented correctly.

Reference the fall protection work plan for:

Specific Work Area: _____________________________________

Work Description: _______________________________________

Date: _______________________

Plan Reviewed by (print name):_____________________________________

Check the following items:

__ Equipment Inspected

__ Contractor(s) Informed

__ Fall Protection Plan on-site

 

Employees who will be working under the fall protection plan:

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

 

Name of person preparing attachment (print): __________________

 

Initials of above person: _________

 

SCAFFOLDING SAFETY

 

Inspection of Scaffolding Equipment Prior to Erection

 

Inspections of scaffolding must be performed by a Competent Person. Unsafe equipment or conditions must be tagged out by Competent Person, and must be complied with.  The three main areas of inspection are for corrosion, straightness of members and welds. This applies to all components of a scaffolding system.

 

  1. CORROSION—Heavily rusted or eroded scaffolding equipment is a telltale sign of abuse or neglect.
  2. STRAIGHTNESS OF MEMBERS—Mishandling, trucking and storing may cause damage to scaffolding equipment. All scaffolding components should be straight

and free from bends, kinks or dents.

  1. WELDS—Equipment should be checked before use for damaged welds and any piece of equipment showing damaged welds or re-welding beyond the original factory weld should not be used. The factory weld reference pertains to location and quality of re-welds. While CORROSION, STRAIGHTNESS, and WELDS are of primary concern other component parts should be checked.
  2. Locking devices on frames and braces shall be in good working order, and if not, must be repaired or replaced prior to use.
  3. Coupling pins must effectively align the frame or panel legs.
  4. Pivoted cross braces must have the center pivot securely in place.
  5. Caster Brakes shall be in good working order and if not must be repaired or replaced prior to use.

 

Safe Bearing Loads for Soils

 

Considering that the allowable load bearing on various soils and rock range from less than 1,000 psf to more than 50,000 psf., care should be exercised in determining the capacity of the soil for every scaffolding job, realizing that weather conditions can turn an otherwise suitable ground condition into a hazardous situation. As an example, dry clay with an allowable bearing capacity of 8,000 psf. could become very plastic after a rainfall and drop to less than 2,000 psf.

 

Care should also be taken not to excessively disturb the soil. If fill is required in areas where scaffolding is used, a qualified engineer should be consulted as to materials and compaction.

 

Foundations

 

The purpose of a good foundation or mud sill is to distribute the scaffolding load over a suitable ground area. The size of the footing or sill is determined by the total load carried over a particular ground area, and by the nature of the soil supporting these sills. The total load should be computed and the sills designed accordingly. When scaffolding from earth or fill, the areas should be leveled and the sills spaced in a pattern assuring adequate stability for all scaffolding legs.

 

Erection of Frames

 

The work of erecting the scaffolding should be under the supervision of a person with proper experience and aptitude for securing a safe installation and who is familiar with all Local, State and Federal Regulations concerning scaffolding.

 

It shall be the responsibility of the person supervising the erection of the scaffold to see that all components and locking devices are in working order, and no damaged or deteriorated equipment is used in the setup.  Should any scaffolding become damaged after the equipment has been erected, workmen shall not be allowed on same until the damaged items have been repaired or replaced.

 

Advanced planning will help the erection of scaffolding to progress smoothly. The equipment should be unloaded as close to the area of use as possible and should be arranged in the order it is to be used. Adjustment screws should be set to their approximate final adjustment before setting up the scaffolding. At this time, a person should check to see that all panels which require coupling pins have them.

 

After erecting the first tier of scaffold frames, plumb and level (using instruments) all frames so that no matter how high the final scaffolding setup, the additional frames will also be in correct alignment.

 

As erection proceeds, securely tie all scaffolding to the structure at the ends and at least every 30' horizontally, and at height intervals not to exceed* 4 times the minimum base dimension. Free standing scaffold towers must be restrained from tipping by guying or other means. Scaffold frames must be fastened together at coupling pins where there is a possibility of uplift.

 

When scaffolds are to be partially or fully enclosed, specific precautions must be taken to assure frequency adequacy of ties attaching the scaffolding to the building due to increased load conditions resulting from effects of wind and weather. The scaffolding components to which the ties are attached must also be checked for additional loads.  When erecting additional lifts, always work from planking placed within the scaffold structure.  Move planking as erection progresses.

 

Planking and Accessories

 

Use only lumber that is properly inspected and graded for use as scaffold plank.  Planking shall have at least 12" of overlap and extend 6" beyond center of support or be cleated at both ends to prevent sliding off support. Do not allow unsupported ends of plank to extend beyond supports. Secure plank to scaffolding when necessary.

 

All scaffold accessories shall be used and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's recommended procedures.  Accessories shall not be altered in the field.  When installing hanger or clamp supported putlogs (trusses), care should be taken to see that they extend at least 6" beyond the point of support. Also, make sure that the proper bracing is placed between putlogs (trusses). When the span between supporting members is more than 12' additional bracing between the putlogs (trusses) and the supporting member may be required. Do not cantilever or extend putlogs (trusses) as side brackets without thorough consideration for loads to be applied or transmitted to the scaffold.

 

When clamping putlogs, clamp capacity may control rather than putlog capacity. Consult scaffold manufacturer.  All brackets should be seated correctly with side brackets parallel to the frames and the end brackets at 90 degrees to the frame. Brackets shall not be bent or twisted from normal position.  Equip all planked or staged areas with proper guard rails and add toe boards when required.

 

Final and Daily Inspection of Erected Scaffolding

 

The following is a list of check points to be covered when making a final and daily inspection of scaffolding prior to use. All points should be carefully checked to insure a safe and accident-free job and be periodically rechecked.

 

  • Check to see that there is proper support under every leg of every frame on the job. Check also for possible washout due to rain.
  • Check to make certain that all base plates and adjustment screws are in firm contact with their supports. All adjustment nuts should be snug against the legs of the frame.
  • Frames should be checked for plumb in both directions.
  • If there is a gap between the lower end of one frame and the upper end of another frame it indicates that one adjustment screw must be adjusted to bring the frames in contact. If this does not help it indicates the frame is out of square and should be replaced.
  • Each leg of each frame should be cross braced to the corresponding leg of the next frame.
  • While checking the cross braces also check the locking devices to assure that they are all in their closed position or that they are all tight.
  • Check to be certain that all planking and accessories are properly installed.
  • Check to make certain all ties are secured between the structure and the scaffolding.
  • Check to be certain all guard rails are in place.
  • If scaffolding is enclosed, check to see that additional precautions have been taken as noted in Section of Erection. Recheck periodically ties, clamps, etc., for movement.
  • Insure that safe access to work platform(s) is provided.

 

Dismantling of Scaffolding

 

The work of dismantling scaffolding should be under the supervision of an individual with proper experience and aptitude. The following should be observed while dismantling.

 

  • Check to see if scaffolding has been structurally altered
  • in any way which would make it unsafe, and if so reconstruct where necessary before commencing with the dismantling procedures.
  • Dismantle scaffold from the top down. Begin by removing all accessories from that lift being dismantled at the time.
  • Always work from a minimum of two plank placed on the tier of frames below those being removed. Move the planking down as dismantling progresses.
  • Do not remove ties until dismantling has reached the tier to which they are attached.
  • Always stay within the inside of the scaffold. Do not climb on the outside for any reason when dismantling.  Do not climb on ties, braces or unbraced frames.
  • Only remove fastening devices from bottom of frames being removed.
  • Lower scaffolding components in a safe manner as they are dismantled. Avoid dropping or throwing the components as this could result in damage to the equipment, or injury to personnel below.

 

Erection of Rolling Towers

 

When erecting rolling scaffolding towers, the following additional items apply. These items are in addition to the application portions of the preceding section.

 

  • Casters should be of adequate load capacity and size in relation to the height of the tower, the surface over which the tower is to be used and in accordance with all government, state, and local codes, ordinances, and regulations.  Casters with plain stems shall be attached to the panel or adjustment screw by pins or other suitable means.
  • Do not extend adjusting screws on rolling towers more than 12".
  • The platform height shall not exceed* four (4) times the smallest base dimension unless guyed or otherwise stabilized.
  • Horizontal diagonal braces should be used near the bottom, top and at 20' intervals measured from the rolling surface.
  • When side brackets are used, consideration should be  given to the overturning effect these brackets will have upon the stability of the tower.
  • Cross brace every lift-both sides.
  • Install guardrails.
  • Plank according to Plank and Accessories Section of Erection Procedure.

 

Final Inspection of Rolling Towers

 

The following additional points should be checked when making a final inspection of rolling scaffold towers prior to their use. These points are in addition to the applicable items covered under the preceding section entitled, "Final Inspection

of Erected Scaffolding."

 

  • Check to see that the platform height does not exceed four (4) times the smallest base dimension unless the tower is properly guyed or otherwise stabilized.
  • Check to see that, if adjusting screws have been used, they are not extended more than 12".
  • Check to make sure the caster brakes are in good working condition and are applied when tower is not being moved.
  • Inspect to make sure horizontal diagonal bracing has been placed near the bottom, top, and at 20' intervals measured from the rolling surface. A hook on manufactured platform properly attached to the top frame may be equivalent to the top horizontal diagonal brace.
  • Cross bracing has been installed on both sides of every lift.
  • Check the area in which the tower is to be used to insure there are no obstructions either in, on, or above the floor which will interfere with the proper and safe use of the rolling tower.
  • Check for guardrails.
  • Check to see that all planks and fabricated platforms are properly installed.
  • Insure that safe access to work platform(s) is provided.
  • Any unsafe conditions found by the competent person shall be tagged and not worked on until the unsafe condition is corrected.

Employee Training

  • Training shall be provided to all employees working on scaffolds regarding scaffolding hazards.  Training shall be done by qualified persons on scaffold safety.
  • The training will cover hazards including fall protection, electrical safety, falling object protection, scaffold use and load.
  • Retraining will be conducted in the event of the following situations:
    • When changes at the worksite present a hazard for which the employee has not been previously trained
    • When changes in the types of scaffolds, fall protection, falling object protection, or other equipment present a hazard about which the employee has not been previously trained
    • When inadequacies in the affected employee's work involving scaffolds indicate that the employee has not retained the requisite proficiency.

 

CONFINED SPACE / PERMIT CONFINED SPACE

 

POLICY

 

Elite HR Logistics is committed to providing a safe and healthful work environment for our entire staff. Therefore, the following written program is in place to identify any Permit-Required Confined Spaces (PRCS) and to eliminate or control hazards associated with PRCS operations. Our company does not work in confined spaces where immediate danger to life & health (IDLH) conditions are present.  Our company does not allow for a single attendant to monitor several confined spaces during an emergency.  Each active confined space will be monitored by a single attendant.

RESPONSIBILITIES

 

Our Confined Space Coordinator (CSC), Sandra Wetzel, is responsible for the overall implementation and maintenance of any written program or any certification concerning the requirements of the Permit-Required Confined Space Standard on our job sites.

 

Permit-Required Confined Space Evaluation. All spaces are evaluated by a Competent Person to determine if any permit spaces are present and the type of program required. Each space is evaluated to determine if full permit program is required, if the permit space can be reclassified as a non-permit space, or if alternative procedures can be used. 

 

Training.   All affected personnel are properly trained and refresher training is given as needed.  Personnel who may be included are any authorized entrants, attendants, entry supervisors, on-site rescue team members and employees who may potentially enter the space.

 

Initial Contacting For Rescue Services.  Rescue and emergency services have been informed of any permit-required confined spaces on our job sites and have been given access to the spaces for drills, training, etc.

 

Equipment.  All equipment needed for safe entry into any permit spaces and non-permit spaces is available and in proper working order.

 

EMPLOYEE PARTICIPATION & ACCESS TO INFORMATION

 

All employees have some responsibility for their own safety. To that end, employees and their designated representatives are consulted on the development and implementation of all aspects of our program. Employees or their designated representatives are encouraged to observe testing or monitoring of spaces. All testing or monitoring data, determinations & supporting data, permits, certifications are readily available to any employee who enters a permit space, or to that employee’s authorized representative. Any permit space will be retested in the presence of an authorized entrant, or that employee’s authorized representative, if requested because they have reason to believe the evaluation was not adequate.

 

PERMIT SPACE IDENTIFICATION

 

The workplace has been evaluated and determined: 

 

  • No Permit-Required Confined Space(s) Exist at the Worksite.
  • Permit-Required Confined Space(s) Have Been Determined to Exist.

 

The location(s) and hazard(s) posed by these permit spaces are listed below:

 

A confined space is a space which:

 

  • Is large enough and so configured that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work
  • Has limited or restricted means for entry or exit (for example, attics, crawl spaces, storage bins, vaults, and pits are spaces that may have limited means of entry.) and;
  • Is not designed for continuous employee occupancy.

 

A permit space is a confined space which has one or more of the following characteristics:

 

  • Contains or has a potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere
  • Contains a material that has the potential for engulfing an entrant
  • Has an internal configuration such that an entrant could be trapped or asphyxiated by inwardly converging walls or by a floor which slopes downward and tapers to a smaller cross-section; or
  • Contains any other recognized serious safety or health hazard.

 

If no permit spaces are identified, no further action is required.

 

PREVENTION OF UNAUTHORIZED ENTRY

 

For permit spaces that are identified on our job site, all potentially exposed employees will be informed of their existence and hazards. The method(s) that will be used will be:

 

  • Posting of danger signs at each permit space reading "Danger, Permit-Required Confined Space, DO NOT ENTER".
  • Other (specify) ______________________________________________

 

It has been determined that the permit spaces identified on our job site:

 

  • Will not be entered by our employees. The following measures have been taken to prevent employees from entering the space(s):

______________________________________________________________________

  • Will be entered by employees of our workplace.

 

PERMIT-REQUIRED CONFINED SPACE (PRCS)

 

A written PRCS Program addresses the following elements for each permit space entered:

 

  • The methods used to prevent unauthorized entry.
  • Identify and evaluate the specific hazards before entry.
  • Establish measures for the safe control of identified hazards such as isolation, purging, inerting, ventilation, barricades, lockout/tagout, etc.
  • Providing and maintaining equipment necessary for safe entry, including testing and monitoring, ventilation, communications, personal protection, lighting, barriers, entry and egress, and rescue equipment.
  • Whenever possible, continuous atmospheric monitoring will be conducted.
  • Continuous monitoring of potential engulfment hazards will be conducted.  For instance, upstream of work being conducted in a storm sewer.
  • Procedure to test the permit space and document results.
  • Procedure to maintain acceptable conditions in the permit space.
  • Identify duties of each employee required and provided training.
  • Provide at least one attendant outside the permit space for the duration of the entry operations.
  • Implement proper procedures for rescue.
  • Establish a written system for preparation, issuance, use, suspension and cancellation of permits.
  • Coordinate entry operations during multiple employer entries.
  • Review entire entry program at least annually, unless previously reviewed at conclusion of a specific entry.

 

ALTERNATIVE PROCEDURES

 

The OSHA regulations allow permit spaces which have, as their only hazard, an actual or potential hazardous atmosphere to use alternative procedures for entry. These alternative procedures do not require the implementation of a full PRCS program.

 

RECLASSIFYING PERMIT SPACE TO NON-PERMIT SPACE

 

The OSHA regulations also allow permit spaces to be reclassified as non-permit spaces by the total elimination of all the hazards. A permit space can be reclassified as a non-permit space if there are no actual or potential atmospheric hazards and if all the other hazards within the space are eliminated without entry into the space.

 

 

PERSONNEL, DUTIES AND TRAINING FOR FULL PRCS ENTRY OPERATIONS

 

Entry into any space where a full PRCS program is mandated requires a specially trained and equipped team. Each team consists of an authorized entrant; attendant; entry supervisor and rescue personnel.

 

Each member of the team receives training prior to initial assignment and annual refresher training. Training will also be provided prior to a change in assigned duties, if a new hazard has been created or special deviations have occurred.  The training is specific for the duties of each team member and includes the procedures and practices necessary to protect them from the dangers of the permit space. Training required for using full Permit-Required Confined Space Procedures includes:

 

  • Types of confined space hazards
  • Components of the written PRCS program
  • Components of the entry permit system
  • Coordination of activities around the confined space site when there are multiple employers on site
  • Components of the hot work permit
  • The need for prompt guarding of the entrance opening
  • Atmospheric testing equipment including its use, calibration and maintenance
  • Atmospheric testing protocol: oxygen, combustibles, toxics; pre-entry, frequent or continuous testing; check all levels of the space
  • Methods for the control or elimination of any atmospheric hazards: inerting; draining and rinsing; purging and cleaning; continuous forced air ventilation
  • Procedures the employees must follow if they detect a hazard
  • The evaluation process to be used for reentry if hazards are detected
  • Train employees on the use of entry equipment (e.g., ladders, communication devices,)
  • Personal protective equipment required: full body harness; respiratory protection; chemical protective clothing; eye and face protection
  • Personnel and their responsibilities: authorized entrant; attendant; entry supervisor; rescue team
  • On-site or Off-site rescue: rescue plan; practice rescues; basic first-aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification; full body harness with retrieval line attached to mechanical retrieval device
  • Procedures for annual review of canceled permits
  • Any other information necessary to ensure employee safety during a permit space entry operation
  • Documentation of the training

 

In addition, the training program for authorized entrants includes:

 

  • Know the hazards associated with the permit space and their effects.
  • Properly use the equipment required for entry.
  • Maintain a continuous means of communication with the attendant.
  • Alert the attendant in the event of an emergency.
  • Evacuate the space if an emergency occurs.

 

In addition, the training program for attendants includes:

 

  • Know the hazards associated with the permit space and their effects.
  • Maintain an accurate account of the authorized entrants.
  • Remain at their assigned station until relieved by another attendant or until the permit space is complete.
  • Monitor conditions in and around the permit space.
  • Summon rescue and applicable medical services in the event of an emergency.
  • Perform non-entry rescue procedures.
  • Perform appropriate measures to prevent unauthorized personnel from entering the permit space.

 

In addition, the training program for entry supervisors includes:

 

  • Know the hazards associated with the permit space and their effects.
  • Verify that the safeguards required by the permit have been implemented.
  • Verify that rescue services are available and that means for summoning them are operable.
  • Cancel the written permit and terminate the permit space entry when required.
  • Summon rescue and applicable medical services in the event of an emergency.
  • Remove personnel who are not authorized to enter the permit space during entry operations.
  • Periodically, determine that the entry operation is being performed in a manner consistent with the requirements of the permit space entry procedures and that acceptable entry conditions are maintained.

 

In addition, the training program for rescue personnel includes:

 

  • Permit space recognition;
  • Permit space hazards;
  • Control of permit space hazards;
  • Atmospheric monitoring equipment and testing protocol;
  • Use and maintenance of personal protective equipment;
  • Rescue equipment;
  • Simulation of permit space rescues and required rescue techniques;
  • Basic first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR);
  • Requirements stated in paragraph (k) and (g) of 1910.146.

 

The following is a list of employees who have been equipped and trained to serve as authorized entrants, attendants, entry supervisors or rescue personnel on our job sites:

 

Authorized Entrants                                       Trainer                         Date of Training

 

Attendant                                                        Trainer                         Date of Training

 

Entry Supervisor                                             Trainer                         Date of Training

 

Rescue Team                                                   Trainer                         Date of Training

 

TRAINING FOR RECLASSIFICATION OR ALTERNATE PROCEDURES

 

Training is given to each employee who has access or potential access to a permit space. The amount of training needed will depend on the individual's duty assignment. The overall intent of this training is to give employees the understanding, knowledge, and skills necessary for the safe performance of their assigned duties in relation to the permit spaces of concern.

 

Four basic categories have been set up to train employees based on duties and potential exposure.

 

10.1 Awareness Training. Awareness training for employees potentially exposed to permit spaces can be satisfied by providing them with the specific information contained in subsection 3 and 4.

 

10.2 Training Required for Using Alternative Procedures. If the space qualifies for alternative procedures, training on the following topics is warranted:

 

  • A major point concerning the use of alternative procedures is that these procedures can only be used when a hazardous atmosphere is the only hazard of concern.
  • The harm associated with the atmospheric hazards of concern including their acceptable entry levels and symptoms of overexposure.
  • Awareness training to recognize other potential hazards in or around the space.
  • Any conditions which may make it unsafe to remove the entrance cover.
  • The need for prompt guarding of the entrance opening.
  • Atmospheric testing equipment including its use, method of calibration and maintenance
  • Atmospheric testing protocol for oxygen, combustibles, toxics.
  • Pre-entry, frequent or continuous testing of the permit space.
  • Check all levels of the space for atmospheric hazards.
  • Atmospheric controls such as inerting; draining and rinsing; purging and; continuous forced air ventilation including type, proper use and placement, its limitations.
  • Procedures the employee must follow if a hazardous atmosphere is detected.
  • The evaluation process to be used for reentry if a hazardous atmosphere is detected or the individual vacates the space and returns some time later.
  • Train employees on the use of entry equipment used including ladders and intrinsically safe lighting.
  • Personal protective equipment (e.g., gloves, hard hat, boots, etc.), its use, limitations and required maintenance.
  • A review of the completed written certification form with the employee prior to entering the space.
  • Any process which may introduce a hazard (e.g., welding, cleaning with solvents) which would prohibit use of alternative procedures.
  • The requirements of paragraph (c)(5) must be reviewed with the employee.
  • Any other information needed to ensure the safety of the employee
  • The documentation of the training.

 

10.3 Training Required for Using the Reclassifying Permit Space Procedures. If the permit space can be reclassified as a non-permit space, the following items must be discussed:

 

  • Documentation of the elimination of the hazards. If the elimination of the hazards or verification of elimination requires employees to enter the space, then a full PRCS program is needed.
  • Hazards associated with the space (i.e., mechanical, chemical, atmospheric) and the methods needed to eliminate the hazards such as: isolation techniques; lockout/tagout; disconnection and misalignment of pipes; double block and bleed; blanking and blinding; removal of engulfment hazards; elimination of hazardous atmosphere by draining, inerting, purging, cleaning, venting
  • Use of entry equipment used to include ladders, ground fault circuit interrupters for electrical equipment, etc.
  • Personal protective equipment, (i.e. gloves, hard hat, boots, etc.) including its use, limitations, and required maintenance.
  • A review of the completed written certification form with the employee entering the space.
  • The requirements of paragraph (c)(7) must be reviewed with the employee(s).
  • Inform employees that any procedures such as welding, cleaning with a chemical, etc. would negate the reclassification and convert the space back to a permit space.
  • Any conditions which may make it unsafe to remove entrance cover.
  • The need for prompt guarding of the entrance opening.
  • Atmospheric testing equipment including its use, method of calibration, and maintenance.
  • Atmospheric testing protocol i.e., oxygen, combustibles, toxics; pre-entry, frequent or continuous testing; check all levels of the space.
  • Procedures the employee will follow if a hazard is detected.
  • The evaluation process to be used for reentry if a hazard is detected or the individual vacates the space and returns some time later.
  • Awareness training to recognize other potential hazards in or around the space.
  • The documentation of the training.

 

RESCUE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

 

The precautions and procedures outlined in our written PRCS program are designed to ensure that our employees are safe while working in permit spaces. Under no circumstances do we expect our employees to enter a permit space where hazards have not been eliminated or effectively controlled.  Additionally, we recognize that unexpected situations might arise that prevent entrants from self-rescue. In response, the following rescue and emergency action plan has been developed and will be strictly enforced.

 

To facilitate non-entry rescue, retrieval systems or methods are used whenever an authorized entrant enters a permit space, unless the retrieval equipment would increase the overall risk of entry or would not contribute to the rescue of the entrant. Retrieval systems meet the following requirements.

 

  • A chest or full body harness, with a retrieval line attached at the center of the entrant's back near shoulder level, above the entrant's head, or at another point which presents a profile small enough for the successful removal of the entrant. Wristlets in lieu of the chest or full body harness if the employer can demonstrate that the use of a chest or full body harness is infeasible or creates a greater hazard and that the use of wristlets is the safest and most effective alternative.
  • The other end of the retrieval line is attached to a mechanical device or fixed point outside the permit space in such a manner that rescue can begin as soon as the rescuer becomes aware that rescue is necessary.
  • A mechanical device is available to retrieve personnel from vertical type permit spaces more than 5 (1.52m) feet deep.

 

In the event that non-entry rescue or retrieval fails to retrieve the worker(s), we have decided to utilize local First Responders as a rescue team.  First Responders will be contacted by calling 911 on a cell phone, or on the house phone, for Emergency Services.

 

PERMIT-REQUIRED CONFINED SPACE PROGRAM REVIEW

 

Within one year of any entry operation, we will conduct a review of the program using the canceled entry permits to identify any deficiencies in our program. A review will be conducted sooner if there is reason to believe that the program does not adequately protect employees. Any corrective measures will be documented by a revision of the program. Employees will be trained on any changes. Additionally, employees who note any inadequacies with the program can contact Sandra Wetzel.

 

POWER TOOL SAFETY

Power tools present greater injury potential than hand tools.  The most frequent injuries involving power tools are cuts, punctures, electric shock, burns and eye damage.  Follow these general safety rules for power tools: 

1)  Know your power tool - Learn the applications and the limitations of the tool as well as the potential hazards specific to the tool. 

2) Ground all tools - If a tool has a three prong plug, it should be plugged only into a three prong receptacle.  If an adapter must be used to accommodate a two prong receptacle, the adapter wire must be attached to a known ground.  Never remove the third prong. 

3)  Keep guards in place and in working order. 

4)  Avoid dangerous environments - Do not use power tools in damp or wet locations without proper grounding protection.  Keep work areas well lit. 

5)  Do not force tools - Do not force a small tool or attachment to do the job of a heavy duty tool. 

6)  Wear proper clothing - Loose clothing or jewelry can get caught in moving parts.  Proper gloves and footwear are recommended. 

7)  Wear safety glasses when working with power tools - Wear appropriate eye, face and respiratory protection if cutting operations produce dust. 

8) Do not abuse cords - Never carry a tool by its cord or yank the cord to disconnect the tool from the receptacle.  Keep the cord away from heat and sharp edges. 

9) Secure the work - Use clamps or a vise to hold the work.  It is safer than using your hands and it frees both hands to operate the tool. 

10) Avoid accidental starting - Do not carry a plugged in tool with your finger on the switch. 

FOLLOW ALL SAFETY RULES AND REDUCE THE CHANCES

OF AN ACCIDENT WITH POWER TOOLS

 

EMPLOYEE EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN

 

FIRE & OTHER EMERGENCIES

 

The following emergency action plan is to be followed.  Employees should be familiar with this plan.

 

  • In the event of a fire or other emergency requiring evacuation, immediately leave the building through the closest practical exit. Meet your Manager at the designated gathering point.
  • The Manager is to account for all employees after emergency evacuation has been completed and assign duties as necessary.
  • Dial 911 on the nearest available phone or cell phone, report the location of the emergency and provide directions to the responders.
  • Contact the Safety Coordinator to advise of the situation.

 

ALARMS SYSTEMS/EVACUATION:

 

Elite HR Logistics establishes that any employee shouting “Fire” or activating a fire alarm is the signal to immediately evacuate the building for fire and other emergencies.  

 

TRAINING:

 

Before implementing the emergency action plan, a sufficient number of persons to assist in the safe and orderly emergency evacuation of employees will be designated and trained.

 

The plan will be reviewed with each employee covered by the plan at the following times:

 

  • Initially when the plan is developed or upon initial assignment.
  • Whenever there are changes in the employee's responsibilities or designated actions under the plan.
  • Whenever the plan is changed.

 

The plan will be kept at the worksite and made available for employee review.

 

HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

 

Elite HR Logistics has developed, implemented, and maintains a hazard communication program that ensures effective communication about associated hazards of some of the substances in our workplace, and the control of these hazards through a comprehensive hazard communication program that includes the elements listed below.

The hazard communication manager, Sandra Wetzel has full authority and responsibility for implementing and maintaining this program.

 

LIST OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES

 

Sandra Wetzel will prepare and keep current an inventory list of all known hazardous substances present in our workplace. Specific information on each noted hazardous substance can be obtained by reviewing the SDSs (see Attachment, “Hazardous Substance Inventory List”).

 

PROPOSITION 65 LIST OF CHEMICALS

 

Sandra Wetzel is responsible for obtaining updates of Proposition 65 listed chemicals and providing new information to affected employees. In the case of newly added chemicals to the Proposition 65 list, the necessary warning will take effect 12 months from the date of listing.

 

SAFETY DATA SHEETS (SDSs)

 

Sandra Wetzel is responsible for obtaining the SDSs, reviewing them for completeness, and maintaining the data sheet system for our company. In the review of incoming data sheets, if new and significant health/safety information becomes available, this new information is passed on immediately to the affected employees by additional training sessions, posting of memos, and other means of communication.

 

Legible SDS copies for all hazardous substances to which employees of this company may be exposed are kept in (List all locations).

 

SDSs are readily available for review to all employees in their work area and during each work shift. If SDSs are missing or new hazardous substance(s) in use do not have SDSs, or if an SDS is obviously incomplete, please contact Sandra Wetzel immediately, and a new SDS will be requested from the manufacturer. If we are unable to obtain the SDS from the vendor within 25 calendar days of the request, we will either call our local Cal/OSHA compliance office or write to:

Division of Occupational Safety and Health

Deputy Chief of Health and Engineering Services

  1. O. Box 420603

San Francisco, CA 94142-0603

 

If anyone has a specific question or needs additional information on an SDS, please call Sandra Wetzel

 

Electronic SDS: (Delete this paragraph if not applicable)

 

If we use alternatives to paper SDSs—computer or microfiche machines with printers or telefax machines—we will make sure that employees have ready access to and know how to operate these devices for retrieval and printing of legible hard copies. Our backup system in the event of failure of the primary SDS retrieval system will be (Insert your system for ensuring that the SDS will continue to be readily available for emergency use)

 

LABELS AND OTHER FORMS OF WARNING

 

Before hazardous substance containers are released to the work area, it is the policy of our company that Sandra Wetzel will verify that all primary and secondary containers.  Note: Supervisors will be the ones relied upon to ensure that the secondary containers are properly labeled are labeled as follows:

 

Label Information

Primary Container

Secondary Container

Identity of the hazardous substance(s)

 

 

Applicable hazard warnings

 

 

Name and address of the manufacturer

 

           

Note: A secondary container is typically one that is not initially labeled and used to hold material that has been transferred from the original, labeled container that was provided by the supplier.

To address exposures to Proposition 65 chemicals, Sandra Wetzel  will provide clear and reasonable warnings to individuals prior to exposure by means of posting signs conspicuously, labeling consumer products, and training employees.

If necessary, Sandra Wetzel will arrange for labels, signs, and other warnings to be printed in other languages.

 

EMPLOYEE INFORMATION AND TRAINING

 

Employees are to attend a health and safety training session set up by Sandra Wetzel prior to starting work. This training session will provide information on the following:

 

  • The requirements of the hazard communication regulation, including the employees’ rights under the regulation
  • The location and availability of the written hazard communication program
  • Any operation in their work area, including non-routine tasks, where hazardous substances or Proposition 65 carcinogens/reproductive toxins are present and exposures are likely to occur
  • Methods and observation techniques used to determine the presence or release of hazardous substances in the work area
  • Protective practices prescribed to minimize or prevent exposure to these substances
  • How to read labels and review SDSs to obtain hazard information
  • Physical and health effects of the hazardous substances, particularly when it comes to use of grease and similar cleaners
  • Symptoms of overexposure
  • Measures employees need to put into practice to reduce or prevent exposure to these hazardous substances by engineering controls, work practices, and use of personal protective equipment
  • Emergency and first-aid procedures to follow if employees are exposed to hazardous substances, grease and similar cleaners in particular
  • The location and interpretation, if needed, of warning signs or placards to communicate that a chemical known to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity is used in the workplace

 

Employees will receive additional training when a new hazard is introduced into the workplace or whenever employees might be exposed to hazards at another employer’s work site.

 

HAZARDOUS NON-ROUTINE TASKS

 

Periodically, our employees are required to perform hazardous non-routine tasks. Prior to starting work on such projects, affected employees will be given information by their supervisor on hazards to which they may be exposed during such an activity.

 

This information will cover:

 

  • Measures taken to reduce the risk of these hazards, such as providing ventilation, ensuring the presence of another employee, providing a respiratory protection program, and establishing emergency procedures
  • Required protective/safety measures

 

Non-routine tasks performed/hazardous chemicals used by employees of this company are given below. You need to create your own list to fit your tasks.

 

LABELED/UNLABELED PIPES (Delete if not applicable)

 

Above-ground pipes transporting hazardous substances (gases, vapors, liquids, semi-liquids, or plastics) shall be identified in accordance with T8 CCR, Section 3321, and “Identification of Piping”.  Other above-ground pipes that do not contain hazardous substances, but may have associated hazards if disturbed or cut (e.g., steam lines, oxygen lines) shall be addressed as follows:

 

Before employees enter the area and initiate work, Sandra Wetzel will inform them of:

 

  • The location of the pipe or piping system or other known safety hazard
  • The substance in the pipe
  • Potential hazards
  • Safety precautions

 

INFORMING CONTRACTORS

 

To ensure that outside contractors work safely in our facility and to protect our employees from chemicals used by outside contractors, Sandra Wetzel is responsible for giving and receiving the following information from contractors:

 

  • Hazardous substances, including Proposition 65 chemicals, to which they may be exposed while on the job site as well as substances they will be bringing into the workplace (To this end, we will provide contractors with information on our labeling system and access to MSDSs).
  • Precautions and protective measures the employees may take to minimize the possibility of exposure.

 

If anyone has questions about this plan, please contact Sandra Wetzel. Our plan will be maintained by Sandra Wetzel to ensure that the policies are carried out and the plan is effective.

 

___________________________________________

(Insert Title of Person Formally Approving the Program)

 

The inventory of the hazardous substances used by employees is given below:

 

HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE INVENTORY LIST

 

Hazardous Substance

Operation/Work Area

MSDS Available

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Program Availability

 

A copy of this program will be made available, upon request, to workers, their designated representatives, and Cal-OSHA.

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2016-03-23 17:02:50 PSTElite HR Logistics IIPP Manual Uploaded by Elite HR Logistics - resumes@elitehrlogistics.com IP 24.7.139.110